Greinasafni: Icelandic Times einnig undir: Heilsa
SagaMedica: Herbal Supplements based on Ancient Viking Traditions

 
Out of Iceland’s many medicinal herbs, Angelica archangelica is the one most deeply rooted in the country’s history. Iceland‘s founding fathers held this potent plant in high esteem and used it for various medicinal purposes. Through research, Icelandic natural products developer SagaMedica has discovered that the Vikings knew what they were doing. The company now offers a product line which addresses various health issues, ranging from frequent urination and dementia to cold and flu prevention.

Modern Research
Explains Traditional Use

SagaMedica‘s director of research, Dr. Sigmundur Gudbjarnason, is a professor emeritus of biochemistry and former president of the University of Iceland. He has studied Icelandic flora extensively since 1992. As any good researcher would do, he initially  started looking into the matter out of plain curiosity. Since Icelandic herbs hadn’t been widely studied in his particular field, Dr. Gudbjarnason was a skeptic at first. However, the historical evidence was too compelling to ignore and he sought to explain it with scientific methods.  It is probably no coincidencethat Iceland’s highest peak, Hvannadalshnjúkur, is named after angelica, or “hvönn”, as Icelanders call it. Other places named after angelica can be found throughout the country suggesting that Iceland’s settlers held the plant in high regard. Written accounts of angelica use are also plentiful, including a 150-yearold  medical book, which is still in use today and details how angelica may be used for medicinal purposes. Iceland’s oldest law book, Grágás, written in the early 12th century, even has a law strictly forbidding the theft of angelica plants. Those who could not resist the  temptation of snatching a few plants from their neighbour’s backyard faced the punishment of being outlawed.

For Viking Health
SagaMedica‘s research even included a field trip to Greenland, where the settlement of Erik the Red was  examined. It turned out that angelica found around Erik‘s farm was similar to angelica growing in Iceland, but unlike the one growing further north in Greenland. This opens up debate on whether Erik might have taken angelica with him from Iceland and planted it around his new home in Greenland. This also poses another interesting question; Did Erik’s son, Leif, bring Icelandic angelica with him on the epic voyage during which he discovered America? Although the Vikings had, rather understandably, no possible means of  proving the usefulness of the angelicaplant, SagaMedica’s researchers have all but nailed it on the head. They have identified many bioactive compounds in angelica which are widely thought to serve a purpose in preventing disease.

SagaMedica currently produces four different products; SagaPro,  SagaMemo, Voxis and SagaVita. These are used for frequent urination in men, memory improvement, for sore throats and cold prevention, respectively. SagaMedica is planning many new products and is working with other manufacturers in Iceland to bring natural products of excellent quality to foreign markets.

Angelica Through Your Mail Slot
SagaMedica‘s supplements can be bought in Icelandic pharmacies, health stores, supermarkets and in the Duty Free store at Keflavik airport. Most of them can also be purchased online at  www.sagamedica.com. SagaMedica ships its products worldwide and they are designed and packed for easy delivery through your mail slot. Attaining and maintaining Viking health for everyday battles has never been easier.


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